Tag: Materials

Microrobots Take Minutes to Detect C. diff in Stool Samples

Detecting bacterial infestations within the GI system, particularly using low cost methods, takes so much time that treatment is often administered too late. Clostridium difficile (C. diff) is a particular nasty nuisance that kills many frail patients, and even with a hospital lab it can take up to two days to get the results. Researchers (Read more...)

Graphene Biosensors to Detect Lung Cancer

Exhaled breath is rich in biomarkers that can point to the presence of disease. In particular, ethanol, acetone, and isopropanol can point to the presence of lung cancer, so having a way of measuring these chemicals in breath might provide a way to diagnose lung cancers or to screen for them. Current methods of measuring […]

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Wearable Respiration Sensors Made from Shrinky Dinks

While there are wearable monitors that measure a person’s respiration rate, they can’t track the volume of air that a patient inspires. For people with asthma and other lung conditions, this is an important indicator that can be used to assess the patient’s status. Engineers at University of California, Irvine have now develo (Read more...)

Innovative Skin to Electrically Power Prosthetic Devices

Powered prosthetic devices need a great deal of electricity to energize them throughout the day. Researchers at the University of Glasgow in Scotland have developed a combination electronic “skin” that can generate and store electricity for prosthetic devices. The technology consists of layers of a finely tuned graphite-polyurethane com (Read more...)

Electric Generator Powers Cardiac Implants from Beating Heart

Cardiac implants, such as pacemakers and cardioverter defibrillators, have limited lifetimes because they’re powered by batteries that cannot be recharged. Replacement surgeries are required roughly every ten years, creating difficulties for patients, many of whom are already fragile, and incurring a huge cost on the healthcare system. Engine (Read more...)

Painless Microneedle Skin Patch Accurately Senses Glucose

Microneedle patches are a promising way to easily and painlessly deliver a variety of drugs into the body. Yet there’s also a lot of potential to use microneedle patches to sense important biochemicals, glucose being probably the most important target. Researchers at KTH Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm, Sweden have developed a (Read more...)

Self-Administered Long-Lasting Contraceptive Patch

  Long lasting female contraceptives typically require trained professionals to perform injections and to implant devices, something that’s not always available in low-resource settings. Researchers at Georgia Tech and University of Michigan have created a microneedle patch that can deliver a long lasting contraceptive by simply being pr (Read more...)

3D-Printed Sugar-Based Stent to Aid Vascular Surgery

Researchers at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln have developed a 3D-printed stent that can aid surgeons in stitching small arteries together. The small tube sits between the open ends of the artery and helps to hold them in place during stitching. The device is 3D-printed using a sugar-based material, meaning that it dissolves and disappears with (Read more...)

3M Body Worn Medical Adhesives at CES 2019

Adhesives are constantly used on patients in hospitals and now with wearables that attach directly to the body there’s greater need for new products that expand capabilities. Wearables require extended usage and adhesives that can last for days on the body have to stay on through sweat, being pulled and pushed, and that can breathe […]

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Electronic Nanomesh Gently Hugs Beating Heart Cells

Unlike with most other cells, studying the heart’s beating cardiomyocytes is prone to difficulty because attaching rigid sensors to moving cells hinders the movement of those cells. A collaboration of Japanese scientists at University of Tokyo, Tokyo Women’s Medical University, and RIKEN research institute have developed (Read more...)

Implant Controls Overactive Bladder Using LED Lights

Today’s neurostimulators, such as those used to control chronic pain, bladder incontinence, and depression, use electricity to activate nerves. While very effective in many patients, electrical stimulation can lead to inflammation, produce unwanted sensations and pain, and injure fragile tissues. Optogenetics is an approach that offers an alt (Read more...)

Implant Simultaneously Reads and Stimulates Brain to Control Parkinson’s, Other Diseases

Electrical stimulation may serve to treat a variety of brain-related conditions, and there are already a number of products that help to control Parkinson’s, essential tremor, addiction, and depression. Though there’s a considerable ongoing progress, most of the currently available technologies are not very smart and certainly can&rsquo (Read more...)