Tag: News

Scientists Make Organs Transparent

Whole organs are difficult to study in minute detail, as they have to be sliced into extremely thin sections to map out their interior. CT and magnetic resonance imaging help to an extent, but researchers at the Helmholtz Zentrum München, Ludwig Maximilians University Munich, and Technical University of Munich in Germany have managed to make [ (Read more...)

New Customizable Bio-Ink for Printing Organs, Tissues

3D printing of tissues and organs requires a bio-ink that can host the living cells that are required for every unique application. A viable construct requires an extracellular matrix that will have the right mechanical and biochemical properties for the intended cells. Researchers at Rutgers University believe they’re on track to being able (Read more...)

Handheld 3D Bioink Printer for Wound Healing

Researchers at the University of Toronto have developed a handheld 3D printer that can deposit a stem cell-loaded bioink onto wounds, such as burns, to promote tissue healing. The device acts like a paint roller, and a clinician could use it to deposit the biomaterial in even stripes on a wound surface. A recent study […]

Body Worn Gas Sensor Sticks to Skin

Potential exposure to dangerous chemicals is a reality for many people working in mining and manufacturing, as well as medicine. While spills of liquids are easily detected, many gases are not. Sensitive wearable gas sensors stuck to the skin would be useful for gas exposure detection, but these devices have to be flexible, need a […]

MolecuLight FDA Cleared to Detect Bacteria Infected Wounds

Knowing whether a wound is infected by a bacterial colony is important for monitoring patients and deciding the course of treatment. Currently, the standard of care is simply to assess the clinical signs and symptoms (CSS) related to the wound in question, but bacterial infections of wounds are typically not obvious until they’re at an [&hell (Read more...)

Silicon Chips as Artificial Neurons

Researchers at the University of Bath in the UK have developed low-power silicon chips that mimic the electrical activity of neurons. This breakthrough could enable the small chips to function as artificial neurons in numerous implants and medical devices, and the technology has significant potential in treating a wide range of chronic diseases, in (Read more...)