Tag: Pediatrics

StethoMe At-Home Stethoscope for Detection of Respiratory Issues in Kids Cleared in Europe

StethoMe, a company headquartered in Poznań, Poland, just won the European CE mark for its eponymous digital stethoscope and accompanying software that analyzes recorded sounds for signs of respiratory problems. StethoMe is intended to be used by parents to check on their kids when there are signs of sickness. Instead of immediately bringing t (Read more...)

Study of People with Extra Fingers Points to New Approaches for Development of Prosthetic Devices

Kids with extra fingers on their hands usually have them removed soon after birth, but some get to keep them into adulthood. This condition, known as polydactyly, is usually looked upon as a disability that has to be studied and addressed. Researchers at the University of Freiburg in Germany, Imperial College London, and the Université [&hel (Read more...)

First Drug-Free Option for ADHD Cleared in America

For the first time, children in the United States will have a non-drug option for treating attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The FDA just cleared the Monarch external Trigeminal Nerve Stimulation (eTNS) System from NeuroSigma, a Los Angeles, California company, to treat ADHD in kids between 7 and 12 years old. The system has already (Read more...)

Wearable Epinephrine Injector to Stop Allergic Reactions

People susceptible to acute allergic reactions, particularly children, can find it difficult to keep an epinephrine injector (think EpiPen) on hand. Adrenaline, the common name of epinephrine, has to be delivered quickly before anaphylactic shock sets in, so a team at Rice University have developed a wearable injector that can be used at any time. (Read more...)

3m Littmann Stethoscope Now with ECG, PCG Superpowers

Modern technologies allow clinicians to assess the heart in all sorts of ways (electrocardiography (ECG), ultrasound, phonocardiography (PCG)), and just about anywhere. Yet, this reality is nowhere near ubiquitous because of high costs, interoperability issues, legacy tools, and frequent dependence on performing exams in a clinical setting by train (Read more...)