Tag: Orthopedic Surgery

Printing Bone Constructs During Surgery

Scientists at Penn State developed a method to print a ‘bone’ construct during a surgical procedure. The technique is intended to allow surgeons to rapidly fill bony defects that would not easily heal by themselves, and the researchers have turbo-charged the technique by including genes that promote bone formation. Consequently, they de (Read more...)

3D Bioprinted Constructs Change Shape Over Time

Researchers at the University of Illinois Chicago have developed a method to create 3D printed cell-loaded bioink constructs that can change shape over time, just like tissues in the body do. Incorporating crosslinking molecules into the printed hydrogels, some of which are UV light-sensitive, allows the constructs to undergo shape changes after pr (Read more...)

Soundwave Microchip to Grow New Bone Cells

Researchers at RMIT University in Australia built a microchip that can induce stem cells to differentiate into bone cells by stimulating them with high-frequency sound waves. The technique lets the researchers create bone cells using stem cells derived from adipose tissue, which are easier to extract than the traditional bone marrow-derived stem ce (Read more...)

Smart Orthopedic Implant to Enhance Bone Growth: Interview with Ben Hertzog, CEO at Intelligent Implants

Intelligent Implants, a medtech company based in Cork, Ireland, has developed the SmartFuse TLIF cage, a spinal implant intended to enhance bone healing and reduce rates of non-union following spinal fusion surgery. The implant is equipped with electrodes that are designed to enhance bone growth, as well as provide a means of monitoring bone healin (Read more...)

Robotic Spinal Replica for Surgical Planning

A team at Florida Atlantic University has developed a 3D-printed replica of a portion of the human spine, based on patient CT data. The patient-specific construct can be attached and articulated by a robotic platform, and a soft magnetic sensor allows the researchers to gauge intervertebral loads as the spine assumes different postures. The model [ (Read more...)

Piezoelectric Scaffold Boosts Cartilage Regeneration

A team of researchers at the University of Connecticut have developed a biomaterial scaffold that generates small amounts of electricity when compressed. The piezoelectric material is intended to facilitate cartilage regeneration in joints. Normal movement of a joint in which the scaffold is implanted will create repeated small bursts of electricit (Read more...)

Shape-Shifting Microbot to Repair Bones

Researchers at Linköping University in Sweden and Okayama University in Japan developed a shape-shifting microrobot that can self-create a bone-like material under the right conditions. The electroactive material responds to low voltage electric current and changes its volume and shape, allowing the researchers to pre-program specific movement (Read more...)

Health Gadgets to Help Beat Sitting All Day

Whether in front of the computer or TV, driving on long commutes, or attending a sporting event, the average person spends more than 12 hours a day sitting. This can take a serious toll on your body in a variety of ways, but muscle and joint pain can be the most immediately apparent. Sitting all […]

Wireless Electronic Sensor to Monitor Bone Health

Engineers and orthopedic specialists at the University of Arizona built an ultra-thin wireless sensor that is designed to monitor bone health over long periods of time. The battery-free device is intended to measure a variety of physiological parameters, such as temperature and bone strain, and could be useful for patients with osteoporosis or to m (Read more...)

3D Blood Vessel Map Reveals Location of Stem Cells

Scientists at Johns Hopkins used a combination of molecular labeling and imaging techniques to create a three-dimensional map of the blood vessels in the mouse skull. Their approach also reveals niches where stem cell populations lurk, which could help researchers to understand how blood vessels and cells behave in various states of disease or inju (Read more...)

Washable Fabric Measures Electrical Activity of Muscles

Researchers at the University of Utah engineered a wearable fabric that can function as a biosensor, measuring electrical activity of muscles. The technology could be useful for physical rehabilitation, allowing clinicians and physical therapists to monitor patients’ progress. The fabric contains a network of silver flakes and gold nanopartic (Read more...)

Synthetic Peptides Jump Around to Repair Spinal Injuries

Researchers at Northwestern University have developed an injectable therapeutic that consists of synthetic peptide sequences intended to regenerate spinal tissue. The team designed the material so that it would allow the peptides to ‘dance,’ with such movements increasing the chance that they will find and interact with receptor protein (Read more...)

Medgadget Reviews the Sleep Number i10 360 Smart Bed

Ten years ago, Sleep Number gave Medgadget the opportunity to try out their advanced beds. As you’ve probably seen on numerous TV commercials and in retail outlets, Sleep Number beds are known for their adjustable firmness, accomplished by changing the air pressure inside their mattresses. We had enjoyed sleeping on the bed, but found that [& (Read more...)

3D-Printed Implant for Personalized Knee Realignments

Researchers at the University of Bath in the UK created a framework for 3D printing personalized high-tibial osteotomy (HTO) plates, using a titanium alloy, for knee realignments in osteoarthritis patients. The plates should fit nearly perfectly when implanted thanks to the new approach. The researchers have also developed an improved surgical tech (Read more...)

Reverse 3D Printing to Make Tiny Medical Implants

Researchers at RMIT University in Australia have developed a new 3D printing technique that allows them to create incredibly small and complex biomedical implants. The approach involves printing glue molds that can then be filled with biomaterial filler. Once the mold is dissolved away, the biomaterial structure remains. Excitingly, the technique u (Read more...)